Richard Vize Public Policy Media Ltd
LATEST ARTICLES
CV
Confusion reigns over urgent care 25 July 2013 Who is in charge? Hidden among the predictable dissection of urgent and emergency care woes in the health select committee report, published on Wednesday, are serious concerns about whether the myriad of new NHS bodies are capable of sorting the problems out. Few people would look at the new NHS structure – which bears more than a passing resemblance to the piping diagram for a gas works – and conclude that what the NHS needs is yet more organisations. But that was indeed what NHS England decided when faced with growing problems in A&E. Ignoring the primacy of clinical commissioning groups, it imposed urgent care boards across the country, under the auspices of its local area teams, charged with rapidly producing plans to sort out A&E. But it then seemed to lose its nerve. Read the full article on the Guardian healthcare network ____________________________________________________________________ Gove’s flawed solution for Doncaster 19 July 2013 The education secretary's decision to strip Doncaster council of its children's services is a turning point in relations between central and local government in the leadership of child protection. On Tuesday, Michael Gove ordered that all the council's children's services apart from education be run by an independent trust for at least five years. This means that, from next April, the secretary of state will be responsible for the safety of Doncaster children. The decision follows the recommendations of a government commissioned review led by professor Julian Le Grand. It is, as the report acknowledges, a major development in children's services. The government was not short of excuses to intervene in Doncaster, where local people have endured more than six years of failed attempts at sustained improvement, punctuated by a long line of inspections and reviews and frequent changes in senior staff. Read the full article on the Guardian local government network ____________________________________________________________________ When will Hunt fall through the ice? 11 July 2013 So far, Jeremy Hunt has been skating over the NHS ice with the practised ease of an impressive communicator. When will he fall through? In the wake of the Francis inquiry, the health secretary has shrewdly positioned himself as the patients' champion against the vested interests of the healthcare system. He moves quickly to condemn failure, even if, as in the case of the Care Quality Commission's recent convulsions over the Morecambe Bay maternity failures, he is not in possession of all the facts. (The unravelling of the Grant Thornton report into the CQC's supposed cover-up means there is now the prospect of an investigation into the investigation into the investigation into the investigation. I can't help thinking there must be a better way of doing things.) Read the full article on the Guardian healthcare network ____________________________________________________________________ Cockell takes the fight to ministers 5 July 2013 Calibrating a Cockell is a delicate science. Cockells are not instruments given to wild swings between boundless joy and rage, but nuanced fluctuations between cautious optimism and irritation. And on Tuesday it was clear Local Government Association leader Sir Merrick Cockell, opening its annual conference in Manchester, was very irritated. The result? The best speech he has given as LGA leader. In measured but firm, often edgy tones he took the fight to both the government and the opposition. He threw at them not demands for more money or a wishlist for a localist Utopia but hard-edged, practical policies to allow councils to help local businesses grow and to redesign public services for a future short of cash but enriched by technological and community resources. Read the full article on the Guardian local government network ____________________________________________________________________ Meet the new public health masters 4 July 2013 How is public health run now? Under the Health and Social Care Act 2012 most public health functions carried out by primary care trusts moved to 152 local authorities—unitary, metropolitan, and county councils and London boroughs. These authorities are responsible for promoting population health and reducing inequalities. Councils now run a diverse range of programmes such as smoking cessation, drug and alcohol services, obesity prevention, and prevention and treatment of violence. The 2012 act created an executive agency, Public Health England, which is part of the Department of Health rather than NHS England. Its responsibilities include health protection, providing information and data, and developing the workforce. NHS England commissions the national immunisation and routine screening programmes, children’s public health services up to the age of 5 years, children’s health information systems, public health services for prisons, and sexual assault referral centres. How is it funded? At least for the first two years, local government public health funding — around £2.7bn for 2013-14 — is ringfenced to ensure it isn’t consumed by other council departments facing cuts. Virginia Pearson, director of public health at Devon County Council, points out that the ringfence has a disadvantage: “Working alongside colleagues who are making cuts when you are sitting in a bubble is quite difficult. It could strain relationships . . . It doesn’t sit well with being a locally accountable structure.” Read the full article at the British Medical Journal ____________________________________________________________________
July 2013
Richard Vize Public Policy Media Ltd
LATEST ARTICLES
CV
Confusion reigns over urgent care 25 July 2013 Who is in charge? Hidden among the predictable dissection of urgent and emergency care woes in the health select committee report, published on Wednesday, are serious concerns about whether the myriad of new NHS bodies are capable of sorting the problems out. Few people would look at the new NHS structure – which bears more than a passing resemblance to the piping diagram for a gas works – and conclude that what the NHS needs is yet more organisations. But that was indeed what NHS England decided when faced with growing problems in A&E. Ignoring the primacy of clinical commissioning groups, it imposed urgent care boards across the country, under the auspices of its local area teams, charged with rapidly producing plans to sort out A&E. But it then seemed to lose its nerve. Read the full article on the Guardian healthcare network ____________________________________________________________________ Gove’s flawed solution for Doncaster 19 July 2013 The education secretary's decision to strip Doncaster council of its children's services is a turning point in relations between central and local government in the leadership of child protection. On Tuesday, Michael Gove ordered that all the council's children's services apart from education be run by an independent trust for at least five years. This means that, from next April, the secretary of state will be responsible for the safety of Doncaster children. The decision follows the recommendations of a government commissioned review led by professor Julian Le Grand. It is, as the report acknowledges, a major development in children's services. The government was not short of excuses to intervene in Doncaster, where local people have endured more than six years of failed attempts at sustained improvement, punctuated by a long line of inspections and reviews and frequent changes in senior staff. Read the full article on the Guardian local government network ____________________________________________________________________ When will Hunt fall through the ice? 11 July 2013 So far, Jeremy Hunt has been skating over the NHS ice with the practised ease of an impressive communicator. When will he fall through? In the wake of the Francis inquiry, the health secretary has shrewdly positioned himself as the patients' champion against the vested interests of the healthcare system. He moves quickly to condemn failure, even if, as in the case of the Care Quality Commission's recent convulsions over the Morecambe Bay maternity failures, he is not in possession of all the facts. (The unravelling of the Grant Thornton report into the CQC's supposed cover-up means there is now the prospect of an investigation into the investigation into the investigation into the investigation. I can't help thinking there must be a better way of doing things.) Read the full article on the Guardian healthcare network ____________________________________________________________________ Cockell takes the fight to ministers 5 July 2013 Calibrating a Cockell is a delicate science. Cockells are not instruments given to wild swings between boundless joy and rage, but nuanced fluctuations between cautious optimism and irritation. And on Tuesday it was clear Local Government Association leader Sir Merrick Cockell, opening its annual conference in Manchester, was very irritated. The result? The best speech he has given as LGA leader. In measured but firm, often edgy tones he took the fight to both the government and the opposition. He threw at them not demands for more money or a wishlist for a localist Utopia but hard-edged, practical policies to allow councils to help local businesses grow and to redesign public services for a future short of cash but enriched by technological and community resources. Read the full article on the Guardian local government network ____________________________________________________________________ Meet the new public health masters 4 July 2013 How is public health run now? Under the Health and Social Care Act 2012 most public health functions carried out by primary care trusts moved to 152 local authorities—unitary, metropolitan, and county councils and London boroughs. These authorities are responsible for promoting population health and reducing inequalities. Councils now run a diverse range of programmes such as smoking cessation, drug and alcohol services, obesity prevention, and prevention and treatment of violence. The 2012 act created an executive agency, Public Health England, which is part of the Department of Health rather than NHS England. Its responsibilities include health protection, providing information and data, and developing the workforce. NHS England commissions the national immunisation and routine screening programmes, children’s public health services up to the age of 5 years, children’s health information systems, public health services for prisons, and sexual assault referral centres. How is it funded? At least for the first two years, local government public health funding — around £2.7bn for 2013-14 — is ringfenced to ensure it isn’t consumed by other council departments facing cuts. Virginia Pearson, director of public health at Devon County Council, points out that the ringfence has a disadvantage: “Working alongside colleagues who are making cuts when you are sitting in a bubble is quite difficult. It could strain relationships . . . It doesn’t sit well with being a locally accountable structure.” Read the full article at the British Medical Journal ____________________________________________________________________