Richard Vize Public Policy Media Ltd
LATEST ARTICLES
CV
Hunt’s political games batter NHS 30 May 2013 Eight weeks after their implementation, Andrew Lansley's reforms have already been battered by his successor. The politicians are just as in charge of the NHS as ever, while clinical commissioners are being marginalised. The reason is that Jeremy Hunt is already focused on the campaign for the next general election, a fact he does little to hide from his advisers. His policies are driven by political point scoring and gestures. When it comes to gestures, Hunt admittedly has some way to go to top Gordon Brown, who took personal charge of hospital cleaning rotas with Labour's "deep clean", in response to public concern about infection rates. But Hunt ran a close second with his plan for remedial bottom-washing  training for nurses to make them care more. Read the full article on the Guardian healthcare network ____________________________________________________________________ Can councils help defeat extremism? 24 May 2013 As the country comes to terms with the first terrorist killing in Britain since the 7/7 bombings, local government will again be at the frontline of keeping communities together. But what should it do? Councils are faced with two priorities: dealing with immediate problems such as the risk of further violence, and then the more complex issues of keeping communities together and tackling radicalisation. The risk of violence breeding violence was apparent within hours of the horrific killing in Woolwich: a small mob tried to create trouble in Greenwich, there was an attempt to start a fire at al-Falah Braintree Islamic Centre in Essex, and a window and bookcases were smashed at a Gillingham mosque. Greenwich, with its diverse population and links with the army and navy stretching back centuries, encapsulates how local government is the place where every part of the community meets. Read the full article on the Guardian local government network ____________________________________________________________________ Ofsted exposes faultline in education 17 May 2013 A sharply worded attack on regulator Ofsted by the senior managers' organisation Solace has again exposed fault lines on local government's role in education. On Tuesday, Ofsted unveiled its new inspection framework for local authorities' school improvement services. Solace claimed that in doing so the regulator "harks back to a bygone era" of council control over schools that "simply no longer exists". What has riled Solace is that the new inspection regime gives councils the responsibility for school improvement without the power to make it happen. Ofsted stresses that not all councils will face inspections, but its seven triggers for going in will catch many. For example, you can expect a visit where the proportion of children who attend a good or better school is lower than the national average, or where there is a higher than average proportion of schools that have not been judged to be good. Read the full article on the Guardian local government network ____________________________________________________________________ Long, difficult road to integrated care 17 May 2013 There is a great deal to welcome in the announcement from health minister Norman Lamb that there will be a big push to integrate health and social care, but the road ahead is longer, more difficult and considerably more costly than the government recognises. The plans provide an ambition around which all care services can unite, and there is a strong commitment to identifying and overcoming the barriers, through the work of at least three waves of large-scale pioneer areas backed up by a dedicated central team. A dozen national health care organisations have pledged support in a declaration of "shared commitment". Every part of the care system will be expected to make progress. But the government is grossly underestimating the investment required to establish integrated services. On the Today programme on Monday, Lamb claimed: "You can achieve savings pretty quickly … If you pool the resources, you can do brilliant things." But this is not backed up by the evidence. Read the full article on the Guardian healthcare network ____________________________________________________________________ Councils hold the key to youth jobless 3 May 2013 One of the few pieces of economic good news is the way employment has held up as the economy has flat-lined. But the latest jobless figures revealed that 979,000 16- to 24-year-olds are out of work. Across the country local government is scrambling to get young people into training and jobs. They are having some success, but they could do so much more if the government would co-operate. The strength of the best local government programmes is that they are finely tuned to the needs of both local employers and young people. Leeds city council has established the Apprenticeship Training Agency, which works with local companies to match young people to apprenticeship opportunities. For local firms, much of the appeal of the scheme lies in the fact that the council has understood what the barriers are to establishing apprenticeships and removed many of them. Read the full article on the Guardian local government network ____________________________________________________________________ Cuts and inertia could crush the NHS 2 May 2013 The NHS is in danger of being crushed between a funding cut and political inertia over the need to reconfigure services. While the outcome of the chancellor's spending review will no doubt contain some financial sophistry to maintain the fiction that health spending is growing in real terms, in reality NHS spending is going to be cut as money leaches out to social care. Whatever George Osborne says on 26 June, the cuts will catch up with the NHS after the general election. In the bloody battle between Whitehall departments over where spending cuts will fall, the Department of Health's case is not helped by others exploiting the NHS's embarrassing secret – there is a lot of waste. Avoidable prescription of expensive branded drugs, inefficient use of operating theatres, delays in pathology services keeping people in hospital and a lamentable record in exploiting IT are just some of the examples of where the NHS can make substantial savings. This is not lost on other ministers, and it certainly isn't lost on local government. Read the full article on the Guardian healthcare network
May 2013
Richard Vize Public Policy Media Ltd
LATEST ARTICLES
CV
Hunt’s political games batter NHS 30 May 2013 Eight weeks after their implementation, Andrew Lansley's reforms have already been battered by his successor. The politicians are just as in charge of the NHS as ever, while clinical commissioners are being marginalised. The reason is that Jeremy Hunt is already focused on the campaign for the next general election, a fact he does little to hide from his advisers. His policies are driven by political point scoring and gestures. When it comes to gestures, Hunt admittedly has some way to go to top Gordon Brown, who took personal charge of hospital cleaning rotas with Labour's "deep clean", in response to public concern about infection rates. But Hunt ran a close second with his plan for remedial bottom-washing training for nurses to make them care more. Read the full article on the Guardian healthcare network ____________________________________________________________________ Can councils help defeat extremism? 24 May 2013 As the country comes to terms with the first terrorist killing in Britain since the 7/7 bombings, local government will again be at the frontline of keeping communities together. But what should it do? Councils are faced with two priorities: dealing with immediate problems such as the risk of further violence, and then the more complex issues of keeping communities together and tackling radicalisation. The risk of violence breeding violence was apparent within hours of the horrific killing in Woolwich: a small mob tried to create trouble in Greenwich, there was an attempt to start a fire at al-Falah Braintree Islamic Centre in Essex, and a window and bookcases were smashed at a Gillingham mosque. Greenwich, with its diverse population and links with the army and navy stretching back centuries, encapsulates how local government is the place where every part of the community meets. Read the full article on the Guardian local government network ____________________________________________________________________ Ofsted exposes faultline in education 17 May 2013 A sharply worded attack on regulator Ofsted by the senior managers' organisation Solace has again exposed fault lines on local government's role in education. On Tuesday, Ofsted unveiled its new inspection framework for local authorities' school improvement services. Solace claimed  that in doing so the regulator "harks back to a bygone era" of council control over schools that "simply no longer exists". What has riled Solace is that the new inspection regime gives councils the responsibility for school improvement without the power to make it happen. Ofsted stresses that not all councils will face inspections, but its seven triggers for going in will catch many. For example, you can expect a visit where the proportion of children who attend a good or better school is lower than the national average, or where there is a higher than average proportion of schools that have not been judged to be good. Read the full article on the Guardian local government network ____________________________________________________________________ Long, difficult road to integrated care 17 May 2013 There is a great deal to welcome in the announcement from health minister Norman Lamb that there will be a big push to integrate health and social care, but the road ahead is longer, more difficult and considerably more costly than the government recognises. The plans provide an ambition around which all care services can unite, and there is a strong commitment to identifying and overcoming the barriers, through the work of at least three waves of large-scale pioneer areas backed up by a dedicated central team. A dozen national health care organisations have pledged support in a declaration of "shared commitment". Every part of the care system will be expected to make progress. But the government is grossly underestimating the investment required to establish integrated services. On the Today programme on Monday, Lamb claimed: "You can achieve savings pretty quickly … If you pool the resources, you can do brilliant things." But this is not backed up by the evidence. Read the full article on the Guardian healthcare network ____________________________________________________________________ Councils hold the key to youth jobless 3 May 2013 One of the few pieces of economic good news is the way employment has held up as the economy has flat-lined. But the latest jobless figures revealed that 979,000 16- to 24-year- olds are out of work. Across the country local government is scrambling to get young people into training and jobs. They are having some success, but they could do so much more if the government would co-operate. The strength of the best local government programmes is that they are finely tuned to the needs of both local employers and young people. Leeds city council has established the Apprenticeship Training Agency, which works with local companies to match young people to apprenticeship opportunities. For local firms, much of the appeal of the scheme lies in the fact that the council has understood what the barriers are to establishing apprenticeships and removed many of them. Read the full article on the Guardian local government network ____________________________________________________________________ Cuts and inertia could crush the NHS 2 May 2013 The NHS is in danger of being crushed between a funding cut and political inertia over the need to reconfigure services. While the outcome of the chancellor's spending review will no doubt contain some financial sophistry to maintain the fiction that health spending is growing in real terms, in reality NHS spending is going to be cut as money leaches out to social care. Whatever George Osborne says on 26 June, the cuts will catch up with the NHS after the general election. In the bloody battle between Whitehall departments over where spending cuts will fall, the Department of Health's case is not helped by others exploiting the NHS's embarrassing secret – there is a lot of waste. Avoidable prescription of expensive branded drugs, inefficient use of operating theatres, delays in pathology services keeping people in hospital and a lamentable record in exploiting IT are just some of the examples of where the NHS can make substantial savings. This is not lost on other ministers, and it certainly isn't lost on local government. Read the full article on the Guardian healthcare network