Richard Vize Public Policy Media Ltd
LATEST ARTICLES
CV
What’s the true cost of axing culture? 20 December 2013 As councils contemplate where next to cut following Tuesday's announcement of a 2.9% reduction in total spending power next year, support for culture risks another financial battering. With individual councils facing funding cuts of up to 6.9%, and growing concern in some authorities about their long-term ability to meet statutory obligations, spending on culture has inevitably been slashed in many areas. However, in a few places councils are fighting hard to maintain support. Some are cutting cash but increasing spending as a percentage, while some have managed cash increases. Read the full article on the Guardian local government network ____________________________________________________________________ Good NHS trusts welome complaints 12 December 2013 Complaints and compliments should be key drivers of reform in any NHS organisation. Services constantly alert to the experiences and views of their patients and staff will spot problems early, respond quickly and effectively, and welcome rather than resent criticism. When warning signs are ignored or not pursued, small difficulties will develop into crises. In the review by NHS England medical director Sir Bruce Keogh of the care provided by 14 trusts with high mortality rates, being slow to learn lessons when things went wrong and failing to drive change through the system were among the faults he identified. Read the full article on the Guardian healthcare network ____________________________________________________________________ US mayors give lesson in leadership 6 December 2013 The growing energy and activism of city mayors in the United States stands in sharp contrast to the UK's ambivalence towards clear civic leadership. US mayors are confronting the big problem in their communities – from education and inequality to transport and crime – using both formal powers and informal leverage. Kansas city mayor Sly James has earned a reputation as an innovator in both transport and technology. He is finally implementing a streetcar project which has been talked about for 30 years in a city which a century ago had a vast network. Read the full article on the Guardian local government network ____________________________________________________________________ NHS competition is out of control 28 November 2013 The government's doctrinal obsession with competition in the NHS is damaging care, holding back improvement and undermining integration. But ditching competition is not the solution. Numerous studies on the impact of competition on the quality of healthcare (John Appleby of the King's Fund has written an excellent summary) broadly demonstrate that when used appropriately it can bring benefits, but it is by no means a universal tool for improvement. There are powerful examples of its successful use. Under Labour, employing independent sector treatment centres to help clear the backlog of operations jolted many hospitals into finding improvements and efficiencies in the way they managed elective surgery. Read the full article on the Guardian healthcare network ____________________________________________________________________ How to keep people out of social care 27 November 2013 Adult social services epitomise the values of a caring community – supporting us when we are at our most vulnerable. But funding cuts mean local governments can no longer meet the needs of local people. A new approach to social care has to be found. The Association of Directors of Adult Social Services reports that in the three years to March 2014, £2.68bn – or about a fifth of the total funding budget – will have been cut from adult social care. Despite this, government and the public expect to see increasingly personalised services and better co-ordination with the NHS – reducing the number of frail elderly admitted to A&E and ensuring social care support is in place to get people out of hospital as soon as possible. Read the full article on Guardian Social Care Network ____________________________________________________________________ Core Cities make a bid for freedom 22 November 2013 The UK's eight largest cities are making a bid for freedom. Following on from the success of the city deals negotiated with the coalition they are now building the case for how devolving power to them will unleash economic growth. At the Core Cities Summit on Thursday Birmingham, Bristol, Leeds, Liverpool, Manchester, Newcastle, Nottingham and Sheffield presented compelling evidence from across Europe of a link between devolved political power and economic growth. The (strikingly male) audience saw data revealing how the UK's cities have substantially lower productivity than London. This is a highly unbalanced picture compared with Germany where better transport links, investment and the control of local taxes have seen cities grow across the country. Read the full article on the Guardian local government network ____________________________________________________________________ Can companies back public health? 18 November 2013 Public health is not yet occupying the space envisaged for it under the Coalition government’s health reforms. Then health secretary Andrew Lansley’s vision was to remove ministers from day-to-day running of the NHS while greatly increasing the Department of Health’s focus on public health. Before the election the Conservatives even floated the idea of renaming the DH the Department of Public Health. Jeremy Hunt is instead micromanaging the NHS and giving far less emphasis to the work of Public Health England. Meanwhile public health directors are doing what all good local government managers should do, and focusing on the needs of their local area. Many are relishing their new freedom outside the centralised NHS. So what is the role for the centre in improving public health? Read the full article on the Cambridge Health Network ____________________________________________________________________ Keogh A&E plan faces major risks 14 November 2013 At last NHS England has the beginnings of a solution to one of the major crises facing the health service. Its long-term plan to address the A&E problems, unveiled on Wednesday, is clinically led, evidence-based, and provides a route to public acceptance. But it will be extraordinarily difficult to implement. Such is the public's attachment to A&E that it probably took a crisis to stand any chance of convincing them of the need for change. Now we have one, most of the media has fallen in line, with even the Daily Mail giving the plan a fair hearing. The proposed timescale of three to five years for transforming urgent and emergency care services in England is ambitious, but it offers the chance to build momentum before the arguments are forgotten. Read the full article on the Guardian healthcare network ____________________________________________________________________ Stevens ushers in hospital data era 13 November 2013 Simon Stevens, incoming chief executive of NHS England, has global expertise in buying healthcare. His arrival will trigger the development of a more analytical, quality focused and rigorous commissioning regime which will compel providers to change their models of care. NHS England's attempt to run the whole system has led to confused lines of accountability with the Care Quality Commission, Monitor and the NHS Trust Development Authority. Clinical commissioning is beset by a sense of drift and lost confidence. Confusion over competition law - notably the role of the Office of Fair Trading - the difficulty of commissioning for outcomes and concerns that decommissioning services will exacerbate financial instability among providers are all contributing to a loss of momentum. Read the full article on Health Service Journal ____________________________________________________________________ Councils chiefs go for growth 12 November 2013 The chief executive role is getting harder. Now the easiest cuts have been made, local authority heads are faced with changing the purpose, culture and organisation of their councils to get them through another decade of austerity. Graham Farrant, joint chief executive for Thurrock unitary authority and the nearby London borough of Barking and Dagenham says that although the first years of cuts have meant tough decisions, they have been manageable and in some cases improvements have been made. "Local government got too fat, and some of the savings we are making have improved services. I've got my director of children's services in Thurrock saying we used to have 40 people (in the office), it's now six, and it's a better service," Farrant says. Read the full article on the Guardian local government network ____________________________________________________________________ Health boards need quick success 8 November 2013 In the run-up to the launch of the new NHS structure in April, one of the few aspects which everyone agreed on was that health and wellbeing boards were a good idea. They were to be the place where clinical services could co-ordinate with all the others which shape people's health – notably social care, housing, and public health – to tackle the root causes of ill health and inequality. In a system dogged by fragmentation and confused accountability, the boards are one of the few places where it is designed to join up. This has led to unrealistic expectations that they can solve problems, such as the integration of health and social care, which governments have grappled with for decades. Read the full article on the Guardian local government network ____________________________________________________________________ Cuts spur social care integration 6 November 2013 Across the NHS, social care and government officials are talking about integration. But political and institutional inertia, and public resistance to change, are impeding progress. Back in 2010, progress was being made towards integrated care in New Zealand's Canterbury region. Then came a series of earthquakes, which significantly damaged hospitals' capacity to function. And yet this gave the integrated care initiative more impetus; disaster compelled change. In Britain the dangers are less violent, but no less real – and yet despite the prospect of another decade of cuts, many staff and most of the public still don't understand what the financial tremors presage. The Guardian, in partnership with Liverpool city council, hosted a high-level roundtable discussion to debate how to meet this challenge. Read the full article on Guardian Society ____________________________________________________________________
November to December 2013
Richard Vize Public Policy Media Ltd
LATEST ARTICLES
CV
What’s the true cost of axing culture? 20 December 2013 As councils contemplate where next to cut following Tuesday's announcement of a 2.9% reduction in total spending power next year, support for culture risks another financial battering. With individual councils facing funding cuts of up to 6.9%, and growing concern in some authorities about their long-term ability to meet statutory obligations, spending on culture has inevitably been slashed in many areas. However, in a few places councils are fighting hard to maintain support. Some are cutting cash but increasing spending as a percentage, while some have managed cash increases. Read the full article on the Guardian local government network ____________________________________________________________________ Good NHS trusts welome complaints 12 December 2013 Complaints and compliments should be key drivers of reform in any NHS organisation. Services constantly alert to the experiences and views of their patients and staff will spot problems early, respond quickly and effectively, and welcome rather than resent criticism. When warning signs are ignored or not pursued, small difficulties will develop into crises. In the review by NHS England medical director Sir Bruce Keogh of the care provided by 14 trusts with high mortality rates, being slow to learn lessons when things went wrong and failing to drive change through the system were among the faults he identified. Read the full article on the Guardian healthcare network ____________________________________________________________________ US mayors give lesson in leadership 6 December 2013 The growing energy and activism of city mayors in the United States stands in sharp contrast to the UK's ambivalence towards clear civic leadership. US mayors are confronting the big problem in their communities – from education and inequality to transport and crime – using both formal powers and informal leverage. Kansas city mayor Sly James has earned a reputation as an innovator in both transport and technology. He is finally implementing a streetcar project which has been talked about for 30 years in a city which a century ago had a vast network. Read the full article on the Guardian local government network ____________________________________________________________________ NHS competition is out of control 28 November 2013 The government's doctrinal obsession with competition in the NHS is damaging care, holding back improvement and undermining integration. But ditching competition is not the solution. Numerous studies on the impact of competition on the quality of healthcare (John Appleby of the King's Fund has written an excellent summary) broadly demonstrate that when used appropriately it can bring benefits, but it is by no means a universal tool for improvement. There are powerful examples of its successful use. Under Labour, employing independent sector treatment centres to help clear the backlog of operations jolted many hospitals into finding improvements and efficiencies in the way they managed elective surgery. Read the full article on the Guardian healthcare network ____________________________________________________________________ How to keep people out of social care 27 November 2013 Adult social services epitomise the values of a caring community – supporting us when we are at our most vulnerable. But funding cuts mean local governments can no longer meet the needs of local people. A new approach to social care has to be found. The Association of Directors of Adult Social Services reports that in the three years to March 2014, £2.68bn – or about a fifth of the total funding budget – will have been cut from adult social care. Despite this, government and the public expect to see increasingly personalised services and better co-ordination with the NHS – reducing the number of frail elderly admitted to A&E and ensuring social care support is in place to get people out of hospital as soon as possible. Read the full article on Guardian Social Care Network ____________________________________________________________________ Core Cities make a bid for freedom 22 November 2013 The UK's eight largest cities are making a bid for freedom. Following on from the success of the city deals negotiated with the coalition they are now building the case for how devolving power to them will unleash economic growth. At the Core Cities Summit on Thursday Birmingham, Bristol, Leeds, Liverpool, Manchester, Newcastle, Nottingham and Sheffield presented compelling evidence from across Europe of a link between devolved political power and economic growth. The (strikingly male) audience saw data revealing how the UK's cities have substantially lower productivity than London. This is a highly unbalanced picture compared with Germany where better transport links, investment and the control of local taxes have seen cities grow across the country. Read the full article on the Guardian local government network ____________________________________________________________________ Can companies back public health? 18 November 2013 Public health is not yet occupying the space envisaged for it under the Coalition government’s health reforms. Then health secretary Andrew Lansley’s vision was to remove ministers from day-to-day running of the NHS while greatly increasing the Department of Health’s focus on public health. Before the election the Conservatives even floated the idea of renaming the DH the Department of Public Health. Jeremy Hunt is instead micromanaging the NHS and giving far less emphasis to the work of Public Health England. Meanwhile public health directors are doing what all good local government managers should do, and focusing on the needs of their local area. Many are relishing their new freedom outside the centralised NHS. So what is the role for the centre in improving public health? Read the full article on the Cambridge Health Network ____________________________________________________________________ Keogh A&E plan faces major risks 14 November 2013 At last NHS England has the beginnings of a solution to one of the major crises facing the health service. Its long-term plan to address the A&E problems, unveiled on Wednesday, is clinically led, evidence-based, and provides a route to public acceptance. But it will be extraordinarily difficult to implement. Such is the public's attachment to A&E that it probably took a crisis to stand any chance of convincing them of the need for change. Now we have one, most of the media has fallen in line, with even the Daily Mail giving the plan a fair hearing. The proposed timescale of three to five years for transforming urgent and emergency care services in England is ambitious, but it offers the chance to build momentum before the arguments are forgotten. Read the full article on the Guardian healthcare network ____________________________________________________________________ Stevens ushers in hospital data era 13 November 2013 Simon Stevens, incoming chief executive of NHS England, has global expertise in buying healthcare. His arrival will trigger the development of a more analytical, quality focused and rigorous commissioning regime which will compel providers to change their models of care. NHS England's attempt to run the whole system has led to confused lines of accountability with the Care Quality Commission, Monitor and the NHS Trust Development Authority. Clinical commissioning is beset by a sense of drift and lost confidence. Confusion over competition law - notably the role of the Office of Fair Trading - the difficulty of commissioning for outcomes and concerns that decommissioning services will exacerbate financial instability among providers are all contributing to a loss of momentum. Read the full article on Health Service Journal ____________________________________________________________________ Councils chiefs go for growth 12 November 2013 The chief executive role is getting harder. Now the easiest cuts have been made, local authority heads are faced with changing the purpose, culture and organisation of their councils to get them through another decade of austerity. Graham Farrant, joint chief executive for Thurrock unitary authority and the nearby London borough of Barking and Dagenham says that although the first years of cuts have meant tough decisions, they have been manageable and in some cases improvements have been made. "Local government got too fat, and some of the savings we are making have improved services. I've got my director of children's services in Thurrock saying we used to have 40 people (in the office), it's now six, and it's a better service," Farrant says. Read the full article on the Guardian local government network ____________________________________________________________________ Health boards need quick success 8 November 2013 In the run-up to the launch of the new NHS structure in April, one of the few aspects which everyone agreed on was that health and wellbeing boards were a good idea. They were to be the place where clinical services could co- ordinate with all the others which shape people's health – notably social care, housing, and public health – to tackle the root causes of ill health and inequality. In a system dogged by fragmentation and confused accountability, the boards are one of the few places where it is designed to join up. This has led to unrealistic expectations that they can solve problems, such as the integration of health and social care, which governments have grappled with for decades. Read the full article on the Guardian local government network ____________________________________________________________________ Cuts spur social care integration 6 November 2013 Across the NHS, social care and government officials are talking about integration. But political and institutional inertia, and public resistance to change, are impeding progress. Back in 2010, progress was being made towards integrated care in New Zealand's Canterbury region. Then came a series of earthquakes, which significantly damaged hospitals' capacity to function. And yet this gave the integrated care initiative more impetus; disaster compelled change. In Britain the dangers are less violent, but no less real – and yet despite the prospect of another decade of cuts, many staff and most of the public still don't understand what the financial tremors presage. The Guardian, in partnership with Liverpool city council, hosted a high-level roundtable discussion to debate how to meet this challenge. Read the full article on Guardian Society ____________________________________________________________________