Richard Vize Public Policy Media Ltd
LATEST ARTICLES
CV
Ambulance overhaul shows way forward 14 July 2017 NHS England’s gutsy move to overhaul the ambulance response system  exemplifies how the NHS can push through controversial changes, and the perils of trying to do it. At first glance the new system appears counterintuitive – allowing 999 call handlers more time to decide the appropriate action, and classifying significantly fewer calls as needing the fastest response. But, crucially, the changes are based on an all-but-bulletproof body of evidence. NHS England claims the Ambulance Response Programme, commissioned in 2015, has been the world’s largest clinical ambulance trial, involving independent analysis of 14m emergency calls over 18 months. It says emphatically that no safety issues were identified with the new approach, and estimates that 250 lives will be saved across England annually. For the public launch, a small army of senior clinicians and other prominent figures was assembled covering everything from acute care to strokes, heart attacks, ambulance services and paramedics. Each explained why the new approach was best for their patients and the wider system. The ambulance improvements are central to the national drive to treat heart attacks and strokes quickly in specialist centres. Instead of the current fiasco of multiple ambulances being sent to the same call, and paramedics on motorbikes being dispatched when an ambulance is needed, the focus is shifting to the outcome for the patient. Read the full article at the Guardian Healthcare Network ____________________________________________________________________
Richard Vize Public Policy Media Ltd
LATEST ARTICLES
CV
Ambulance overhaul shows way forward 14 July 2017 NHS England’s gutsy move to overhaul the ambulance response system exemplifies how the NHS can push through controversial changes, and the perils of trying to do it. At first glance the new system appears counterintuitive – allowing 999 call handlers more time to decide the appropriate action, and classifying significantly fewer calls as needing the fastest response. But, crucially, the changes are based on an all-but-bulletproof body of evidence. NHS England claims the Ambulance Response Programme, commissioned in 2015, has been the world’s largest clinical ambulance trial, involving independent analysis of 14m emergency calls over 18 months. It says emphatically that no safety issues were identified with the new approach, and estimates that 250 lives will be saved across England annually. For the public launch, a small army of senior clinicians and other prominent figures was assembled covering everything from acute care to strokes, heart attacks, ambulance services and paramedics. Each explained why the new approach was best for their patients and the wider system. The ambulance improvements are central to the national drive to treat heart attacks and strokes quickly in specialist centres. Instead of the current fiasco of multiple ambulances being sent to the same call, and paramedics on motorbikes being dispatched when an ambulance is needed, the focus is shifting to the outcome for the patient. Read the full article at the Guardian Healthcare Network ____________________________________________________________________