Richard Vize Public Policy Media Ltd
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The role of mental health in terrorism 27 April 2017 The shift in the terrorist threat from networks to lone attacks has put mental health and the protection of vulnerable people at the centre of the UK’s counterterrorism strategy. Metropolitan Police assistant commissioner Mark Rowley, the national lead on counterterrorism policing, tells The BMJ that the involvement of the NHS in Prevent—the part of the counterterrorism plan aimed at stopping people becoming terrorists—is “massively important, more important than it’s ever been.” He says, “We have wrestled with terrorism in the UK for at least 50 years, but for most of that time—whether it was the IRA or Al Qaeda—there were secret networks planning attacks, and the sort of people they recruited had to be highly trustworthy and reliable.” Now, terrorist groups try to incite people through propaganda on the internet and social media to carry out attacks: “Part of that has led them to—sometimes accidentally, sometimes very deliberately—trying to exploit vulnerable people.” Rowley claims that, of the people involved in the 13 attacks that the security services say they have foiled since 2013, “a disproportionate number of them do have mental health issues.” He would not specify a number. Rowley emphasises that any suggestion that mental illness causes terrorism is “complete nonsense.” Instead, the concern of the police is that people with vulnerable mental health are susceptible to being targeted: “If part of the terrorist methodology is to prey on the vulnerable and trying to exploit them and to radicalise them to commit acts of violence, then it stands to reason that there will be people with certain mental health conditions who will be . . . susceptible to that.” “Radicalising and inciting someone who is vulnerable to go and carry out some ghastly attack seems to be part of their tactics, and that has brought in a whole load of vulnerability issues, including mental health, that we now have to wrestle with.” Read the full article at the BMJ ____________________________________________________________________ Mayors will be new breed of NHS leader 22 April 2017 While Labour will be desperate to push the NHS to the centre of the general election campaign, and the Liberal Democrats will be emphasising their commitment to mental health services, it is the six regional mayors being elected for the first time in May who could provide the biggest surprise when it comes to health policies. The exact powers of the six – covering Tees Valley, Greater Manchester, Liverpool city region, West Midlands, West of England and Cambridgeshire & Peterborough – vary depending on the deal each region reached with the government, but none of them will control the NHS. However, like any self-respecting local politician, the candidates are not allowing the limits of their formal powers to deter them from trying to influence such an important policy area. The manifesto of Andy Burnham, Labour’s candidate for mayor of Greater Manchester, typifies the influence mayors intend to wield. Burnham wants to cut waiting times for child and adolescent mental health services, manage the transition from child to adult mental health services more effectively, have a plan to get local people into NHS jobs, provide more incentives for services to shift from treatment to prevention, and “introduce in Greater Manchester the country’s first fully-integrated National Health and Care Service, building on the work that is already ongoing”. Read the full article on the Guardian Healthcare Network
Richard Vize Public Policy Media Ltd
LATEST ARTICLES
CV
The role of mental health in terrorism 27 April 2017 The shift in the terrorist threat from networks to lone attacks has put mental health and the protection of vulnerable people at the centre of the UK’s counterterrorism strategy. Metropolitan Police assistant commissioner Mark Rowley, the national lead on counterterrorism policing, tells The BMJ that the involvement of the NHS in Prevent—the part of the counterterrorism plan aimed at stopping people becoming terrorists—is “massively important, more important than it’s ever been.” He says, “We have wrestled with terrorism in the UK for at least 50 years, but for most of that time—whether it was the IRA or Al Qaeda—there were secret networks planning attacks, and the sort of people they recruited had to be highly trustworthy and reliable.” Now, terrorist groups try to incite people through propaganda on the internet and social media to carry out attacks: “Part of that has led them to—sometimes accidentally, sometimes very deliberately—trying to exploit vulnerable people.” Rowley claims that, of the people involved in the 13 attacks that the security services say they have foiled since 2013, “a disproportionate number of them do have mental health issues.” He would not specify a number. Rowley emphasises that any suggestion that mental illness causes terrorism is “complete nonsense.” Instead, the concern of the police is that people with vulnerable mental health are susceptible to being targeted: “If part of the terrorist methodology is to prey on the vulnerable and trying to exploit them and to radicalise them to commit acts of violence, then it stands to reason that there will be people with certain mental health conditions who will be . . . susceptible to that.” “Radicalising and inciting someone who is vulnerable to go and carry out some ghastly attack seems to be part of their tactics, and that has brought in a whole load of vulnerability issues, including mental health, that we now have to wrestle with.” Read the full article at the BMJ ____________________________________________________________________ Mayors will be new breed of NHS leader 22 April 2017 While Labour will be desperate to push the NHS to the centre of the general election campaign, and the Liberal Democrats will be emphasising their commitment to mental health services, it is the six regional mayors being elected for the first time in May who could provide the biggest surprise when it comes to health policies. The exact powers of the six – covering Tees Valley, Greater Manchester, Liverpool city region, West Midlands, West of England and Cambridgeshire & Peterborough – vary depending on the deal each region reached with the government, but none of them will control the NHS. However, like any self-respecting local politician, the candidates are not allowing the limits of their formal powers to deter them from trying to influence such an important policy area. The manifesto of Andy Burnham, Labour’s candidate for mayor of Greater Manchester, typifies the influence mayors intend to wield. Burnham wants to cut waiting times for child and adolescent mental health services, manage the transition from child to adult mental health services more effectively, have a plan to get local people into NHS jobs, provide more incentives for services to shift from treatment to prevention, and “introduce in Greater Manchester the country’s first fully- integrated National Health and Care Service, building on the work that is already ongoing”. Read the full article on the Guardian Healthcare Network