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Healing the scars of the Bosnian War 10 July 2018 More than two decades after the Bosnian war, memories of the conflict and caring for the living—and the dead—still define many lives in the Balkan state. Ilijaz Pilav was a doctor in the mining town of Srebrenica, close to the Serbian border, when Serb forces encircled the largely Muslim population in 1992. Like many Bosnian towns it is surrounded by hills, an easy target for artillery and mortars. The 1992-95 war followed the breakup of the former Yugoslavia. After the republic of Bosnia and Herzegovina voted for independence Serb forces mobilised to secure continuous territory across a swathe of the country, forcing out inhabitants through its policy of ethnic cleansing. Most doctors in Srebrenica fled. That left five—including Pilav and one trapped there while visiting after graduating medical school—for a population swelled to 40 000 by refugees. “The city was under siege from the beginning—no electricity, no medicines, no sanitation materials, and for a couple of months no food. We five doctors with humble experience of medicine had to solve every problem,” Pilav says. Until the Serbs advanced on Srebrenica three years later and massacred Muslim men and boys, in what the International Criminal Tribunal in The Hague described as genocide, “there were bombardments every night,” says Pilav, who as a Muslim was at risk himself. “From the beginning the number wounded was huge.” Read the full article at the BMJ __________________________________________________________________ NHS won’t be saved by reorganisation 5 July 2018 The seven-decade history of the National Health Service is littered with organisations which have come and gone. Regional health authorities, primary care trusts, strategic health authorities, the NHS University, the Health Education Authority, the Health Development Agency, the NHS Modernisation Agency, the Commission for Healthcare Improvement, the Trust Development Authority – all bodies scrapped in what Nuffield Trust chief executive Nigel Edwards has described as “major extinction events”.  Politically driven re-engineering has tended to focus on intermediate management structures such as regional layers, commissioning and regulatory bodies, and agencies designed to drive system changes such as clinical improvement. The UK’s predilection for reorganising its health system is unusual by international standards, according to Mark Britnell, former director general for NHS commissioning and now global chair of healthcare, government and infrastructure for KPMG. “That doesn’t mean to say that systems don’t change. For example, in the Nordics there has been a greater push towards regionalisation while Australia and Canada have pushed for larger hospital and health board areas to facilitate integration, but my impression is that the NHS goes through reorganisation convulsions whereas other systems try to manage change more organically.” Read the full article at Civil Service World __________________________________________________________________
Public Policy Media Richard Vize
Public Policy Media Richard Vize
LATEST ARTICLES
CV
Healing the scars of the Bosnian War 10 July 2018 More than two decades after the Bosnian war, memories of the conflict and caring for the living—and the dead—still define many lives in the Balkan state. Ilijaz Pilav was a doctor in the mining town of Srebrenica, close to the Serbian border, when Serb forces encircled the largely Muslim population in 1992. Like many Bosnian towns it is surrounded by hills, an easy target for artillery and mortars. The 1992-95 war followed the breakup of the former Yugoslavia. After the republic of Bosnia and Herzegovina voted for independence Serb forces mobilised to secure continuous territory across a swathe of the country, forcing out inhabitants through its policy of ethnic cleansing. Most doctors in Srebrenica fled. That left five—including Pilav and one trapped there while visiting after graduating medical school—for a population swelled to 40 000 by refugees. “The city was under siege from the beginning—no electricity, no medicines, no sanitation materials, and for a couple of months no food. We five doctors with humble experience of medicine had to solve every problem,” Pilav says. Until the Serbs advanced on Srebrenica three years later and massacred Muslim men and boys, in what the International Criminal Tribunal in The Hague described as genocide, “there were bombardments every night,” says Pilav, who as a Muslim was at risk himself. “From the beginning the number wounded was huge.” Read the full article at the BMJ __________________________________________________________________ NHS won’t be saved by reorganisation 5 July 2018 The seven-decade history of the National Health Service is littered with organisations which have come and gone. Regional health authorities, primary care trusts, strategic health authorities, the NHS University, the Health Education Authority, the Health Development Agency, the NHS Modernisation Agency, the Commission for Healthcare Improvement, the Trust Development Authority – all bodies scrapped in what Nuffield Trust chief executive Nigel Edwards has described as “major extinction events”.  Politically driven re-engineering has tended to focus on intermediate management structures such as regional layers, commissioning and regulatory bodies, and agencies designed to drive system changes such as clinical improvement. The UK’s predilection for reorganising its health system is unusual by international standards, according to Mark Britnell, former director general for NHS commissioning and now global chair of healthcare, government and infrastructure for KPMG. “That doesn’t mean to say that systems don’t change. For example, in the Nordics there has been a greater push towards regionalisation while Australia and Canada have pushed for larger hospital and health board areas to facilitate integration, but my impression is that the NHS goes through reorganisation convulsions whereas other systems try to manage change more organically.” Read the full article at Civil Service World __________________________________________________________________