Richard Vize Public Policy Media Ltd
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A Royal Commission would be a mistake 12 January 2018 As patients die in corridors and A&E performance drops to its lowest ever level, calls are growing for a royal commission to address the mounting problems facing the NHS. This would be a big mistake. This week the commission idea was raised in prime minister’s questions and the Centre for Policy Studies has published a remit for one. The attraction of a royal commission is that it offers a chance to cut through the party political noise to allow calm consideration of the issues. But the realities of setting one up far outweigh the potential benefits. Virtually everything about a commission would harm the NHS. If it was announced on the health service’s 70th anniversary in July, by the time the members had been approved, the remit agreed, evidence gathered and the report written, even the most nimble commission would have taken at least three years. (The last one on the NHS, set up under Harold Wilson, took four years.) That would put it within months of the 2022 general election. So legislation would have to wait until at least the first Queen’s speech of the next parliament, which means nothing would change before April 2024. Read the full article at the Guardian Healthcare Network __________________________________________________________________ What will an NHS winter be like in 2020? 5 January 2018 What pressure will the NHS be under in the first week of 2020, and what will be the consequences? This winter, the NHS finally ran out of road. Among the deluge of data revealing the depth of the current problems, three shocking figures stand out. So far, 23 out of 152 acute hospital trusts have declared black alerts – this means a wet week in January is a “serious incident” preventing them offering comprehensive care. BBC analysis shows that, this winter, more than one in eight ambulances taking patients to hospital on an emergency call have had to wait more than 30 minutes to hand over to A&E staff. People who have had strokes are among them. In the last week of 2017, bed occupancy averaged 91.7%, with virtually every trust in the country exceeding the widely accepted safe threshold of 85%. The pressures are no less in general practice. So there is no safety valve, no reserve capacity, no underused resource. Old-style winter planning – such as opening extra wards – is largely redundant because hospitals need their entire capacity all year round. So in winter they have nothing left to give. Read the full article at the Guardian Healthcare Network __________________________________________________________________
Richard Vize Public Policy Media Ltd
LATEST ARTICLES
CV
A Royal Commission would be a mistake 12 January 2018 As patients die in corridors and A&E performance drops to its lowest ever level, calls are growing for a royal commission to address the mounting problems facing the NHS. This would be a big mistake. This week the commission idea was raised in prime minister’s questions and the Centre for Policy Studies has published a remit for one. The attraction of a royal commission is that it offers a chance to cut through the party political noise to allow calm consideration of the issues. But the realities of setting one up far outweigh the potential benefits. Virtually everything about a commission would harm the NHS. If it was announced on the health service’s 70th anniversary in July, by the time the members had been approved, the remit agreed, evidence gathered and the report written, even the most nimble commission would have taken at least three years. (The last one on the NHS, set up under Harold Wilson, took four years.) That would put it within months of the 2022 general election. So legislation would have to wait until at least the first Queen’s speech of the next parliament, which means nothing would change before April 2024. Read the full article at the Guardian Healthcare Network __________________________________________________________________ What will an NHS winter be like in 2020? 5 January 2018 What pressure will the NHS be under in the first week of 2020, and what will be the consequences? This winter, the NHS finally ran out of road. Among the deluge of data revealing the depth of the current problems, three shocking figures stand out. So far, 23 out of 152 acute hospital trusts have declared black alerts – this means a wet week in January is a “serious incident” preventing them offering comprehensive care. BBC analysis shows that, this winter, more than one in eight ambulances taking patients to hospital on an emergency call have had to wait more than 30 minutes to hand over to A&E staff. People who have had strokes are among them. In the last week of 2017, bed occupancy averaged 91.7%, with virtually every trust in the country exceeding the widely accepted safe threshold of 85%. The pressures are no less in general practice. So there is no safety valve, no reserve capacity, no underused resource. Old- style winter planning – such as opening extra wards – is largely redundant because hospitals need their entire capacity all year round. So in winter they have nothing left to give. Read the full article at the Guardian Healthcare Network __________________________________________________________________