Richard Vize Public Policy Media Ltd
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How to put citizens at the heart of NHS 3 November 2017 With ever-growing pressures from funding, staff shortages, demand and targets, is it possible to bring joy back to the healthcare workforce and put patients at the centre of their care? A group of healthcare leaders think it is. Frustrated by the difficulties of getting back to what really matters in healthcare but convinced there was a way forward, two dozen people from health and social care got together as the Industry Coalition Group to get some fresh thinking into discussions around NHS reform. Healthcare at Home put some funding in and brought the group together; Mike Bell, chair of Croydon health services NHS trust, led the discussions, and the result was the 2,000 Days Project, launched at the King’s Fund and Cambridge Health Network this week. In the spirit of full disclosure, I should add that I wrote the report. The 2,000 days refers to the first and last 1,000 days of our lives. Maternity and infancy profoundly affect our life chances and lifetime consumption of healthcare. Giving every child a strong start is morally right, economic common sense and good for the NHS. The last 1,000 days crystallise the issues of choice and empowerment; how care can maximise the quality of life, rather than simply its length, and how to get the most value from healthcare resources. Read the full article at the Guardian Healthcare Network __________________________________________________________________ Blows fly over children’s mental health 20 October 2017 The mauling of NHS England chief executive Simon Stevens by children’s commissioner Anne Longfield over mental health services is a rare example of brutal disputes between officials breaking out in public. The children’s commissioner for England, a post created in 2004, exists to stand up for the rights of children, particularly on issues affecting the most vulnerable. It is certainly not part of the remit to make the NHS, or any other part of the state, feel comfortable about what they do for children. Longfield’s bust-up with Stevens began when she sent a briefing to MPs ahead of World Mental Health Day on 10 October. The brief is a coruscating critique of children’s mental health provision, describing it as bleak and shocking, particularly in comparison with adult mental health care. The thrust of her argument was that help only reaches around a fifth of children with a mental health condition, while a failure to intervene early means scarce resources are being drained away on expensive in-patient care which benefits few children. A failure to prioritise children’s mental health means most local areas are failing to meet NHS standards for improving services or providing crisis support. Read the full article at the Guardian Healthcare Network __________________________________________________________________ NHS is getting desperate as winter nears 6 October 2017 As the NHS careers towards winter, signs of desperation can be seen across the country. Since the summer, at least six hospital trusts and two ambulance services  have been dealing with allegations of bullying. Two chief executives have been forced out for failing to hit the A&E target. More might follow. Local government is getting another beating over the growing problems around moving older people out of hospital after treatment. The Health Service Journal says the Department of Health is threatening to direct how social care funding is used at councils with the worst records for delaying transfers of care. The bed days lost each month to delayed transfers hover close to 200,000. Most are caused by the NHS, although social care’s total has been growing faster. Hospitals have entire wards of people trying to get home. Lest any chief executives might have forgotten that A&E is a priority, recently appointed chief inspector of hospitals, Prof Ted Baker, has sent everyone a handy guide on what they should be doing. It is important to “know whether each patient has a serious problem”, apparently. More helpfully, Baker also stresses the importance of empathetic leadership and managing staff wellbeing. But does that mean a consultant in A&E who breaches the four-hour wait target after sending exhausted staff home will be supported, or will their chief executive be put in front of the next NHS Improvement firing squad? Read the full article at the Guardian Healthcare Network __________________________________________________________________
Richard Vize Public Policy Media Ltd
LATEST ARTICLES
CV
How to put citizens at the heart of NHS 3 November 2017 With ever-growing pressures from funding, staff shortages, demand and targets, is it possible to bring joy back to the healthcare workforce and put patients at the centre of their care? A group of healthcare leaders think it is. Frustrated by the difficulties of getting back to what really matters in healthcare but convinced there was a way forward, two dozen people from health and social care got together as the Industry Coalition Group to get some fresh thinking into discussions around NHS reform. Healthcare at Home put some funding in and brought the group together; Mike Bell, chair of Croydon health services NHS trust, led the discussions, and the result was the 2,000 Days Project, launched at the King’s Fund and Cambridge Health Network this week. In the spirit of full disclosure, I should add that I wrote the report. The 2,000 days refers to the first and last 1,000 days of our lives. Maternity and infancy profoundly affect our life chances and lifetime consumption of healthcare. Giving every child a strong start is morally right, economic common sense and good for the NHS. The last 1,000 days crystallise the issues of choice and empowerment; how care can maximise the quality of life, rather than simply its length, and how to get the most value from healthcare resources. Read the full article at the Guardian Healthcare Network __________________________________________________________________ Blows fly over children’s mental health 20 October 2017 The mauling of NHS England chief executive Simon Stevens by children’s commissioner Anne Longfield over mental health services is a rare example of brutal disputes between officials breaking out in public. The children’s commissioner for England, a post created in 2004, exists to stand up for the rights of children, particularly on issues affecting the most vulnerable. It is certainly not part of the remit to make the NHS, or any other part of the state, feel comfortable about what they do for children. Longfield’s bust-up with Stevens began when she sent a briefing to MPs ahead of World Mental Health Day on 10 October. The brief is a coruscating critique of children’s mental health provision, describing it as bleak and shocking, particularly in comparison with adult mental health care. The thrust of her argument was that help only reaches around a fifth of children with a mental health condition, while a failure to intervene early means scarce resources are being drained away on expensive in-patient care which benefits few children. A failure to prioritise children’s mental health means most local areas are failing to meet NHS standards for improving services or providing crisis support. Read the full article at the Guardian Healthcare Network __________________________________________________________________ NHS is getting desperate as winter nears 6 October 2017 As the NHS careers towards winter, signs of desperation can be seen across the country. Since the summer, at least six hospital trusts and two ambulance services have been dealing with allegations of bullying. Two chief executives have been forced out for failing to hit the A&E target. More might follow. Local government is getting another beating over the growing problems around moving older people out of hospital after treatment. The Health Service Journal says the Department of Health is threatening to direct how social care funding is used at councils with the worst records for delaying transfers of care. The bed days lost each month to delayed transfers hover close to 200,000. Most are caused by the NHS, although social care’s total has been growing faster. Hospitals have entire wards of people trying to get home. Lest any chief executives might have forgotten that A&E is a priority, recently appointed chief inspector of hospitals, Prof Ted Baker, has sent everyone a handy guide on what they should be doing. It is important to “know whether each patient has a serious problem”, apparently. More helpfully, Baker also stresses the importance of empathetic leadership and managing staff wellbeing. But does that mean a consultant in A&E who breaches the four-hour wait target after sending exhausted staff home will be supported, or will their chief executive be put in front of the next NHS Improvement firing squad? Read the full article at the Guardian Healthcare Network __________________________________________________________________